Tag Archives: David Krejci

David Krejci is still chipping away

David Krejci, Upper Deck, 2015-16

There is hardly the space to shower the correct praise upon all the Bruins who deserve it.

For example: Tuukka Rask is playing at a god-level, to a point that the “what took so long” crowd has conveniently overlooked that he’s been an excellent goaltender in this league for a decade now. Patrice Bergeron is as solid and skilled a player as one could hope to be. Brad Marchand is a professional jerk in all the best ways. David Pastrnak is a kid at heart who also happens to be a total sniper. David Backes is chasing a dream. Zdeno Chara is defying time and age and remains absolutely terrifying.

And those are the primary storylines as the Bruins line up against the St. Louis Blues in an effort to get their name on the Stanley Cup for the seventh time. Missing in there is David Krejci, quietly leading his line, playing in every scenario and generally being the silent stalwart he’s been since earning his place in 2007.

For a group that cherishes its history and loves to fete its longtime players, Krejci doesn’t get the attention he likely deserves. But through this most recent playoff run, he’s done nothing to damage his place in history. Continue reading

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A brief history of the Captials’ ownership of Boston

The Bruins had a nice thing going recently. They’d won five in a row and they were just about back to full health (with just Charlie McAvoy out, and he’s reported to be on his way back soon). Solidifying one of the three automatic spots in an increasingly challenging Atlantic Division seems more likely now than it did a few weeks ago. Just about everything’s going well here.

Naturally, all this made the Capitals’ arrival in Boston perfectly timed.

For the 14th consecutive game, the Capitals had their way with the Boston. There are a number of reasons and explanations for all 14 of these losses, I suppose — timing, injuries, roster turnover, etc. — but it’s hard not to feel particularly victimized by goalie Braden Holtby and the indominable Alex Ovechkin. Continue reading

Torey Krug and cures for the winter blues

Welcome to the first days of the dead of winter. Work schedules have resumed, unabated by holiday cheer and all the festive goodies that come with it. Snow is starting to appear and the days are getting colder and colder as they ramp up towards the real stuff we’re likely due in February.

So when I come home, it’s nice to change into something comfortable, sit by my desk and have something pleasant to focus on, possibly in the background or possibly with rapt attention. A hockey game is great for this, of course. There’s the swishing of skates and pucks against the ice, the roars and groans of a crowd when appropriate, goal horns and whistles to signal your more significant moments, on and on.

But it’s more than just the sound. It helps to have a team to root for, and the Bruins have been that team for most of my life, with the added benefit of actually becoming a good team for most of my adult life. There’s Jack Edwards screaming about some improbable save or grave injustice, there’s Patrice Bergeron winning another faceoff, there’s Zdeno Chara clearing pucks and bodies away from Tuukka Rask. The constants are comforting, and the competitiveness just feeds into that compelling nature.

Another competitive constant has to be Torey Krug. He’s a frantic ball of energy on the blue line, and he’s prone to the occasional ridiculous play.

Continue reading

The Bruins are trying to kill me.

I know the Bruins miss David Krejci, but my God...

Jesus Christ.

On this evening, I missed all but the final two minutes due to work obligations. At first, I was bummed to learn I’d be missing the game. Of course I’d be bummed. I arguably live and die more with the Boston Bruins than any other team (arguably meaning I argue with myself over this — no one else cares, I’m sure). Going into the playoffs, winning a series would have been huge given how uneven their regular season turned out. Polishing off Buffalo in six, having Savard return and running up a 3-0 lead on Philadelphia? Huge! Absolutely stupendous. Some of my happiest moments as a Bruins fan to be sure.

And, late on this night, it all seems like an eternity ago.

I’m glad I couldn’t watch this. The Bruins have managed to find the one scenario in which advancing to the second round could be turned into the negative. As a Red Sox fan, naturally, I have strong memories of a team battling back from three games down in a best-of-seven series. And the way Philadelphia has marched back …

I can’t even say it. The possibility is just too awful.

But, through all these thoughts, terrible and horrifying as they may be, I keep coming back to this:

“This is how they respond after David Krejci breaks his wrist?”

Apparently so.