Tag Archives: Tuukka Rask

David Krejci is still chipping away

David Krejci, Upper Deck, 2015-16

There is hardly the space to shower the correct praise upon all the Bruins who deserve it.

For example: Tuukka Rask is playing at a god-level, to a point that the “what took so long” crowd has conveniently overlooked that he’s been an excellent goaltender in this league for a decade now. Patrice Bergeron is as solid and skilled a player as one could hope to be. Brad Marchand is a professional jerk in all the best ways. David Pastrnak is a kid at heart who also happens to be a total sniper. David Backes is chasing a dream. Zdeno Chara is defying time and age and remains absolutely terrifying.

And those are the primary storylines as the Bruins line up against the St. Louis Blues in an effort to get their name on the Stanley Cup for the seventh time. Missing in there is David Krejci, quietly leading his line, playing in every scenario and generally being the silent stalwart he’s been since earning his place in 2007.

For a group that cherishes its history and loves to fete its longtime players, Krejci doesn’t get the attention he likely deserves. But through this most recent playoff run, he’s done nothing to damage his place in history. Continue reading

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A brief history of the Captials’ ownership of Boston

The Bruins had a nice thing going recently. They’d won five in a row and they were just about back to full health (with just Charlie McAvoy out, and he’s reported to be on his way back soon). Solidifying one of the three automatic spots in an increasingly challenging Atlantic Division seems more likely now than it did a few weeks ago. Just about everything’s going well here.

Naturally, all this made the Capitals’ arrival in Boston perfectly timed.

For the 14th consecutive game, the Capitals had their way with the Boston. There are a number of reasons and explanations for all 14 of these losses, I suppose — timing, injuries, roster turnover, etc. — but it’s hard not to feel particularly victimized by goalie Braden Holtby and the indominable Alex Ovechkin. Continue reading

Ignoring baseball because it’s the Cup

This is Tuukka Rask. He does not play baseball.

This is Tuukka Rask. He does not play baseball.

Last night, the Red Sox were down to their final strike when Will Middlebrooks, batting against Tampa Bay closer Fernando Rodney, laced a change-up into the outfield for a bases-clearing double. The Sox went up 4-3, Junichi Tazawa picked up the win in relief, and if I’m imagining the scenario correctly, most of the crowd went home happy, since this took place in Tampa and no one there seems to care about the Rays one way or the other.

Apparently, it was a hell of an at-bat for Middlebrooks, who is rebounding from a minor slump and on his way back towards the torrid pace he carried through April, when the Red Sox were busy surprising a jaded fan base and sitting in first place. The mighty Jon Couture actually has a great breakdown of Middlebrooks’ at-bat here, complete with his growing patience and his success reading the pitcher and the situation.

They’re a game back of the Yankees this afternoon for the top spot of the American League East, and they’re playing some fun games, even when they lose. But don’t ask me about details, because I’ve missed all of them lately. Simply, it’s because the Bruins are in the playoffs, and it is functionally impossible for me to concentrate or devote any sort of emotional focus on the Red Sox when this is the case. Continue reading

Tim Thomas just stopped four shots, a bank robbery and a train

This is why you dont trade a goalie if you dont have to.

It’s about time I dropped all journalistic pretense and slobbered all over Tim Thomas.

Thomas, if you haven’t been paying attention, has been an absolute beast. As of this writing, he leads the NHL in save percentage (.945), goals against average (1.80) and is tied for the shutout lead with five.

He has also made a number of insane saves, including this gem against Toronto a few weeks ago.

The Bruins wound up losing that night in a shootout, but to be honest, they had no business even getting a point out of that game, if not for Thomas. I felt guilty that night; it was a Saturday, I was out at dinner with some friends, and I could see the game on a TV across the room. And a number of times, I was caught glancing over shoulders and reacting to one insane save after another. That one was one of 38, and despite the loss, I caught myself watching that save repeatedly.

I could go quite deep here in the “I Told You So” department. That despite Tuukka Rask’s brilliance last season, trading Thomas didn’t make sense; that his salary wasn’t the albatross that many in the impatient Boston media painted it to be; that you don’t pin your hopes on a 22-year-old goaltender without insurance; that Thomas played hurt last year, explaining the drop in performance…

Well, to be clear, I’m not going to extrapolate on those individual points anymore than I already have.

No, what I want this to be is a simple gesture, a note to point out Thomas’ brilliance this season. In front of a shaky defensive corps, he has played magnificently, making saves that has left jaws scraping the ice in wonder. He’s been the Bruins’ MVP so far, keeping them in a race on nights when they don’t seem to want to play.

I was in attendance on Dec. 18 against Washington. After taking a quick 3-0 lead in the first period, the Bruins stopped shooting, putting only nine shots on the Washington net in the final two periods. In the third period alone, Washington woke up and peppered Thomas with 26 shots. He stopped 25 of them. 25 saves in a single game would be solid; he pulled that out in a period. The Bruins hung on for a 3-2 win.

So, raise your glasses to Tim Thomas, that trapeze artist hiding behind goalie pads, a white mask and a black-and-gold sweater. Vote to send him to the All-Star game, and take a moment to appreciate the clinic he’s putting on this season.

And remember: This is why you don’t trade goalies.

Five things to … whatever, here are the Bruins

Big Z will be in Black & Gold for years to come.

In about an hour, the Boston Bruins will kick off their 2010-11 campaign against the Phoenix Coyotes in David Krecji’s backyard, Prague, Czech Republic. I have my jersey out, snacks ready, likely forward lines consumed, salary cap fretted. I am ready to go.

But in the event you aren’t, here are five things to at least think about for the upcoming season. Some are warnings, some are fun things to look forward to, and some are mild predictions. Enjoy.

1. The Bruins are perilously close to the salary cap

As Blackhawk fans know, the $59.4 million cap is nothing to laugh about. The Bruins are currently under, but only to the benefit of Marco Sturm’s recovery from the knee injury he suffered in last year’s playoffs. When he’s healthy, his $3.5M cap number will have to be accounted for, which means someone (Michael Ryder?) will have to go.

2. The progression of Tyler Seguin

With Marc Savard out indefinitely due to post-concussion syndrome, the Bruins’ top pick will center a third line between Ryder and Blake Wheeler. Should Savard come back, or if the Bruins acquire another centerman, Seguin will likely ride the right wing with March Recchi and Patrice Bergeron, the much-heralded “Past, Present and Future” line.

The Bruins haven’t had a high-profile rookie since Joe Thornton and Sergei Samsonov debuted in 1997-98. Thornton came along slowly, but Samsonov was a blast to watch. It should be fun to watch Seguin grow up.

3. Zdeno Chara’s contract extension

Chara, as of Friday morning, was still hopeful that he could have a new deal before the start of the season, which seems happily optimistic. It’s Saturday morning now, and there’s still no extension, but that doesn’t mean negotiations will go the way of the pumpkin when the puck is dropped at noon, Eastern time. The two sides will likely keep negotiating, as the Bruins are no stranger to signing deals mid-season. Just last year, Tuukka Rask, Milan Lucic and Savard were all made richer after the season started.

Bergeron was given a three-year, $15M extension on Friday. Is Chara’s around the corner?

UPDATE: Chara has just signed a 7-year, $45M extension. Like, just now. Awesome.

4. The return of Milan Lucic

There is no one more fun to watch that Lucic, when healthy. Last year was nearly a lost season, with Lucic not returning to form until late in the playoffs, when he became a wrecking ball in front of the net. With the benefit of the off-season, Lucic should be back to full strength and making all those 17-clad fans in the balcony deliriously happy.

To that end, here are five crazy clips of Lucic from YouTube: 1 2 3 4 5

5. Rask via Thomas

Tim Thomas’ woes last season were likely due to his hip injury, which has since been corrected via surgery. It’s obvious that Tuukka Rask is the present and the future, but it was also pretty clear that Rask became fatigued as the playoffs wore on. The Bruins have, essentially, two number one goalies, and the common thought is that Thomas should be traded. Why?

Their combined cap number is $6.25M. That’s less than the Panthers are paying Tomas Vokoun, the Devils for Martin Brodeur, the Canucks for Roberto Luongo, and so on. This is not a problem, this is a blessing. Have them each play 41 games or so, ride the hot hand in the playoffs, and don’t be afraid to spell one or the other should the team go deep.

All that said, I have rosters to print out, hockey cards to pour over, pizza bagels to make and an apartment to tidy up. Here’s to the 2010-11 season, whatever it may bring.